Archive for the ‘Collections’ Category:


An Unique Retreat on Turkey’s South Coast – Peter Scholten’s Lycia House

  ho loves Turkey more than me? What feeds my soul more than the beauty of carpets, kilims and textiles? What are some of my most restoring activities? A long swim, a hike through the quiet of archeological ruins, a day at the beach or just relaxing in beautiful, peaceful surroundings with a good book are all ways that I love to unwind from the daily routine of city life. Jack and I have found the perfect place to settle for a week of rest and relaxation. We are guests this week at Peter Scholten’s newly opened Lycia House on Turkey’s south coast. Located high above the Mediterranean in the small village…

Anticipating a Visit to the David Collection of Islamic Art in Copenhagen

fter some time spent in Istanbul and Western Turkey this spring I have plans to revisit the David Collection in Copenhagen, Denmark.  I want another opportunity to  study this extraordinary collection of Islamic Art. Housed in a recently renovated space in central Copenhagen the museum is located in two early 19th c buildings thoughtfully conceived with series of intimate spaces to showcase an extensive collection and variety of art of the Islamic world.

Tiles in the Harem of the Topkapi Palace, Istanbul.

y sister came for her first visit to Turkey this spring.  An early morning ferry ride across the Bosphorus, a tram ride up the hill to Sultanahmet and we were near the front of the line for tickets to the Topkapi Palace.  To view the Harem of the palace it requires purchasing a separate ticket within the Palace grounds.   At the main ticket office it indicated that the Palace opened at 9 a.m. and the Harem opened at 9:30 a.m.  On passing into the inner courtyard we went directly to purchase our tickets for the Harem and to our surprise they waved us through into the Harem.  What a unique experience!  I had never been in those rooms without swarms of others and we had the place to ourselves with perhaps half a dozen others who were lucky enough to stumble upon an early entrance. The Topkapi Palace hosts collections that are vast and diverse – textiles, weapons, the treasury,  and religious artifacts plus the kitchen complex with an extensive collection of porcelain, but for

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Film: A Doorway to Central Asian Art and History

hopping for clients in Istanbul for carpets or textiles has meant that over the years many wonderful pieces from Central Asia have passed through my hands.  I have a personal attraction to this art. The colours, designs and magnificent workmanship enthrall me and the more I see of this group of carpets and textiles the deeper my appreciation  becomes.  In our home some of my favorite rugs and textiles trace their roots back to Central Asia. This month I saw a documentary that furthered my understanding of Central Asia.  The Desert of Forbidden Art by Tchavdar Georgiev and Amanda Pope is the story of Igor Savitsky, a man of passion and focus who during and after the Russian Revolution amassed a clandestine collection of over 40,000 pieces of avant garde Russian art.   These works represent a group of Russian artists working in a style that was a fusion of European modernism overlaid with the influence of images of Central Asia.  Some art historians have compared this fusion to the art of

Out of the Closet – A Central Asian Garment

arpets, textiles, embroideries; all things tactile be they Turkish or Central Asian, from this or that corner of the globe, all have held a level of fascination for me. In my previous post I wrote about the challenge of speaking in public.  Dare I call it a phobia but whatever was at work in my psyche as an adult I have avoided situations where I have had to address an audience larger than a handfull of people.  I have had encouragement from many people in my life to break beyond this self imposed limitation. One quote that remains in my mind was from my daughter Leah, my business partner, who said, “Mom, you are passionate and knowledgable about this area just let your passion show.”  There was a definite ring of truth to her encouragement. So standing on the foundation of so many words of support, I broke through the barrier that has muzzled me publicly for years.  My thanks to each of you who spoke words of encouragement to me and helped me to open my mouth

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Head to Toe – An Incidental Collection

Garments from Turkey and Central Asia

y preparations for an upcoming presentation to the New Calgary Rug and Textile Club are now  underway.  On Saturday, January 14th from 2 to 4 pm at the new Taylor Digital Library at the University of Calgary I will show and speak about a group of garments which I have collected over the years in Istanbul.  These pieces were acquired one by one as I pursued my primary business of purchasing antique carpets and textiles for various clients.  If you are local and want to come along there is a nominal fee of $5 to attend or better still purchase a membership to the club and enjoy future presentations and lectures($25 for single membership or $50 for a couple).  I am in the midst of the process of sorting out what to include, what to exclude, which format to use, and a seemingly myriad of small decisions as I do the ‘mental sort’ of all the details that exist in my head and need to be corralled to create a degree of order. Rather than

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A KILIM’S JOURNEY FROM ISTANBUL TO CANADA

osephine Powell used to tell me stories of the nomadic tribes of Turkey and their culture and weaving traditions.  Josephine would speak of the life in the summer camps as the people settled in the high mountain pastures for the flocks to graze while the women were weaving both carpets and kilims. A friend asked me the other day after reading my blog ‘what is a kilim?’  I explained that

Transylvanian Carpets at the Nickle New Galleries with Stefano Ionescu

he New Calgary Rug and Textile Club hosted Stefano Ionescu for a lecture in the new Nickle Galleries at the University of Calgary in the recently opened Taylor Family Digital Library Building.  Ionescu is a resident of Rome, Italy and an independent scholar in the field of Anatolian carpets in Transylvanian churches. He presented an informative perspective on how these collections of Ottoman (Turkish) carpets dating from the 16th c onwards came to be a part of the Protestant churches décor in Romania. During the Reformation in the 16th c the churches had their traditional art removed.   Frescoes, icons and other religious art was either plastered over or in the case of icons removed from the church sanctuaries.  This resulted in places of worship with

TEXTILES, CARPETS, MUSEUMS AND MORE IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

  KASHMIRI SHAWLS – A TEXTILE OF MAGNIFICENCE ow strong must one be to lift a carpet? How much strength to move a kilim? A hand loomed saddle cover? Or perhaps to hold the whisper light heft of a kashmiri shawl? Last week I had wonderful days in Los Angeles and San Francisco visiting with collectors, viewing museum collections, attending a dealers fair and hearing lectures on various related topics. The morning after my arrival in LA I attended a lecture delivered to the Textile Museum of America’s Southern California Associates by Dr David Reisbord on the subject of Kashmiri shawls. It was a time to learn and to be amazed by the technical complexities of this weaving tradition. Both men and women have worn these diaphanous and colorful shawls through the centuries with the oldest known pieces dating to the mid 17th c.   A Tibetan ibex was the source for the incredibly fine wool used to weave these textiles. The ‘shatoush’ or the fleece from the underbelly of the animal was so fine

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